DaST Lectures on Ethnophilosophy and Ethnomathematics

DaST LECTURES ON ETHNOPHILOSOPHY AND ETHNOMATHEMATICS
[ by Bal Chandra LUITEL ]

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At Palácio Belmonte, by Castelo de São Jorge, next 21 January, 4and 18 February,4 and 18 March, 8 and 22 April, 6 and 20 May, 18h. DaST Lectures on Ethnomathematics and Ethnophilosophy are  meant for educators, philosophers and anthropologists.
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Bal Chandra LUITEL
(Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at Kathmandu University and Postdoc EMMA WEST at Universidade de Évora)
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S U B J E C T
Curriculum elaboration in developing countries entails integration in cultural contexts. Reconciling contrary views about the nature of mathematics (e.g., mathematics as a pure body of knowledge and mathematics as an impure knowledge system) is the first necessary step for creating a space for engaging curriculum materials.
During his postdoctoral semester, Bal Chandra Luitel will present his experience in local communities, the Hindu philosophical and religious frames, the concept of inclusive education, the best practices as used, and his own theoretical framework.

T O P I C S t o B E a d d r e s s e d
Nature of mathematics as an orienting perspective of mathematical evolution in Nepal, Indian subcontinent, and other parts of Asia. (lectures 1 & 2).
Comparative picture of the evolution of mathematics in Indian subcontinent, reductionism versus holism (lecture 3)
Multiple-ways of knowing in the Eastern and Western traditions: Comparative epistemologies in mathematical knowing (lectures 4 & 5).
Poetic, metaphorical, dialectical and narrative ways of knowing; voice and solitude; knowing the unknown—a case of infinity! (lecture 6).
Calculus in and from India, spirituality and mathematical knowing, mathematical knowing and Tantra, contextualism and  universalism— a case of Shiva’s Tandava dance (lecture 7).
Culture as an empowering (and disempowering) perspective; metaphor of  SaGuna and NirGuna—their relation with postcoloniality (lectures 8 & 9).
Reconceptualising mathematics education through Neti-Neti and Emptiness, multiple forms of dialects in Vedic and Buddhist traditions (lectures 10 & 11).
Emergent versus a priori view of mathematical knowing, goals of mathematics education as per Eastern and Western philosophical traditions (lecture 12)
 
Q U E S T I O N S t o B E a n s w e r e d
How has mathematics evolved in Nepali and Indian cultures (possible topic areas: Vedic, Buddhist and Vernacular cultures and their mathematical practices in Nepal; Development of Calculus in South India)?
How does a culture studies perspective offer multiple ways of knowing in mathematics? What evidences are there from within the history of mathematics in different Nepali and Indian cultures?
In what ways can mathematics education be re-conceptualized in accordance with a culture studies perspective? What are its limitations? How can these perspectives be broadened?

For any questions, please contact zct@uevora.pt or go to http://ethnolectures.vacau.com/

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